Second Hand Bridal Salons In Michigan


Salons


Salons


While the service sector is attracting more and more attention in society, interior design for service spaces is getting increasingly popular. Beauty and hairdressing salons have begun to focus on offering more considerate services. Accordingly, interior design for such spaces tends to highlight human-centered and personalized strategies. In this book, focusing on the theme of beauty and hairdressing salon interior design, we chose a collection of outstanding projects from all over the world, illustrating up-to-date beauty and hairdressing salon interiors with many eye-catching pictures.


Todays: $64.95

American Salons


American Salons


In American Salons , Robert Crunden provides a sweeping account of the American encounter with European Modernism up to the American entry into World War I. Crunden begins with deft portraits of the figures who were central to the birth of Modernism, including James Whistler, the eccentric expatriate American painter who became the archetypal artist in his dress and behavior, and Henry and William James, who broke new ground in the genre of the novel and in psychology, influencing an international audience in a broad range of fields. At the heart of the book are the American salons–the intimate, personal gatherings of artists and intellectuals where Modernism flourished. In Chicago, Floyd Dell and Margery Currey spread new ideas to Sherwood Anderson, Theodore Dreiser, and others. In London, Ezra Pound could be found behind everything from the cigars of W. B. Yeats to the prose of Ford Madox Hueffer. In Paris, the salons of Leo and Gertrude Stein, and Michael and Sarah Stein, gave Picasso and Matisse their first secure audiences and incomes; meanwhile, Gertrude Stein produced a new writing style that had an incalculable impact on the generation of Ernest Hemingway. Most important of all were the salons of New York City. Alfred Stieglitz pioneered new forms of photography at the famous 291 Gallery. Mabel Dodge brought together modernist playwrights and painters, introducing them to political reformers and radicals. At the salon of Walter and Louise Arensberg, Marcel Duchamp and Francis Picabia rubbed shoulders with Wallace Stevens, Man Ray, and William Carlos Williams. By 1917, no art in America remained untouched by these new institutions.From the journalism of H. L. Mencken to the famous 1913 Armory Show in New York, Crunden illuminates this pivotal era, offering perceptive insights and evocative descriptions of the central personalities of Modernism.


Todays: $114.99

Les Salons


Les Salons


This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts – the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.


Todays: $33.5

French Salons


French Salons


Among the most enduring of French cultural institutions, the salon, is among the most misunderstood. Seen primarily as a venue for apolitical social gatherings, the salon’s influence is generally believed to have ended during the French Revolution. In French Salons, Steven Kale challenges conventional thinking about the salon. Drawing on an impressive range of primary sources, he offers a nuanced history of this institution from the eighteenth century through the Revolution of 1848 which emphasizes continuity and evolution over disjuncture and highlights its shifting political character and relevance. Salons, Kale shows, originally provided opportunities for the exchange of literary and philosophical ideas among the French aristocracy. Central to the maintenance of salon culture were salonniA]res, aristocratic women such as Madame de StaAl who opened their homes to fellow elites and nurtured a sociability that united the members of high society. Salons provided ready-made venues for aristocratic politics during the early years of the French Revolution, when salons were transformed into places where the upper classes could express their political opinions and concerns. Even at the height of the Terror, salons did not dissolve but, rather, were displaced as aristocrats moved their social networks of influence to such cities as Coblenz, Brussels, and London. Napoleon sought to manipulate salon culture for his own ends, but with his fall from power, salons reemerged and proliferated. Although never intended to serve as political clubs, salons became informal sites for the cultivation of political capital and the exchange of political ideas during the Bourbon Restoration and the July Monarchy. By 1848, the conditions that sustained aristocratic sociability declined, and salons became increasingly marginal to French public life. At the same time, new political institutions — parties, the press, legislative bodies — emerged that more effectively disseminated and shaped political opinion and led to real political change. Challenging many of the conclusions of recent historiography, including the depiction of salonniA]res as influential power brokers, French Salons offers an original, penetrating, and engaging analysis of elite culture and society in France before, during, and after the Revolution.


Todays: $23.44

Second Hand


Second Hand


Richard owns a secondhand store ("Satori Junk") just outside Detroit. He’s the kind of guy for whom not much happens, until it happens all at once: His mother dies. He rummages his parents’ basement for good junk and finds (alongside "every purse my mother has ever owned since the Fifties") a box of photos that changes his view of everything He falls apart over his mother’s notes on his favorite meal in an old cookbook. He meets Theresa, a fellow hipster, a thrift-attired junk goddess who shares his feeling for castaways and he falls for her — hard. Along the way he acquires some junk wisdom about love and loss. Richard’s inimitable hilarious philosophical, self-deprecating, yearning voice and his sharp and loving eye for common foibles and unexpected virtues make for a comic novel crammed Fall of surprise and pleasure. Second Hand is peppered with insight as unpretentious and satisfying as the unexpected garage sale find, Junk Richard tells us "has taught me that to find new use for an object discarded is an act of glistening purity I have learned that a camera case makes a damn fine purse or that 40 copies of Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass’s Whipped Cream and Other Delights’ may be used to cover a wall of a bedroom…. Junk has taught me that all will come to junk eventually, and much sooner than you think."


Todays: $3.95

Second Hand Bridal Salons In Michigan

Handmade Expressions: Fighting Poverty Through Fair Trade



Second Hand Bridal Salons In Michigan